bookmark_border5 Remakes that pass for originals

We’re growing tired of remakes.  Some rehashes claim to be better than the original, but we’re not sure “better” is the right word.

Do we need another Karate Kid, another Dr. Doolittle, another Ghostbusters, another Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, or another Steel Magnolias?  What was wrong with the first film?

(The second Karate Kid was okay,  but “Pick up your coat” is incredibly lazy compared to “wax on, wax off.”)

However, some remakes add something, and in some ways improve upon the original.  A few, in fact, are so good that we sometimes think that the remake is the original. Continue reading “5 Remakes that pass for originals”

bookmark_borderEaster Eggs.

For most, Easter is a wonderful time of year.  Schools (and even many employers) are closed, so families of all religions can celebrate together.  Some paint boiled-eggs, then hide them for children to find. Others use chocolates (or even toys) in place of boiled eggs.  In any case, they are hidden in places that aren’t obvious, but for obvious reasons aren’t too hard to find.

Children then seek out these treats, which they enjoy and share.  This is called the Easter Egg hunt.

When children look for the eggs, they come equipped with baskets. Though some make it competitive, organizers usually ensure that there are enough eggs for everyone. Sometimes we even limit what each child can gather.

The spirit of Easter is about giving and even sharing, not competition. (Although there are sports competitions that sometimes accompany the hunt.) Continue reading “Easter Eggs.”

bookmark_borderApocalypse Now Redux: review

Walter Murch, yes the Walter Murch, travelled all the way to Aberystwyth to take questions on his film, Apocalypse Now.

Okay, so Murch was only the sound stylist, right? An editor, not a director, star, screenwriter or even a producer. Producers take home the best picture award, directors get to be thought of the auteur, actors get famous, screenwriters can say they thought it all up, but without people working below the line there’s only so much you can do.

Continue reading “Apocalypse Now Redux: review”

bookmark_borderMountains Out of Molehills

Mountains out of molehills

 

Mountains out of molehills
First published on Social Media: Mar 1, 2016


I had many titles for this post. The ass-u-mers, The Bore Who Cried Adolf, A Pipe is just a Pipe, but most of them were, well, a bit hyperbolic.

Anyway, take a look at the image above for a few seconds, and register in your head what it is.

Done that? Good, now scroll down so you can’t see it.

Done that too? Good, now get out a piece of paper and a pencil and see if you can draw the image from memory. This isn’t a test of artistic skills, just see if you remember what the image was of.

Have you finished with that? How well did you remember the image? Continue reading “Mountains Out of Molehills”

bookmark_borderWhich Ghostbuster are you?

There are many great films about entrepreneurship, and the importance of a great team.   Two of my favourite are the first Ghostbusters (1984) and the first Cool Runnings (1993).  I haven’t seen the remake of Ghostbusters, I’m not a real fan of remakes.

Now, here’s a little game: Which of these are you? Continue reading “Which Ghostbuster are you?”

bookmark_borderThe Disaster Artist (review)

At Ptara, I directed two microbudget feature films. Make that nanobudget.

One had a crew of two (excluding the three actors, who also crewed, and a few kids who helped out on sound one day), and the other was basically me editing a large variety of footage to make it coherent. There were challenges in both, and everyone learned a lot.  And, what these films lack in production values is made up for in performance and storyline.

By contrast, Tommy Wiseau’s “The Room” had a budget that was about 1000 times either of my films.  He worked with a much more expensive kit and a more experienced cast and crew. Yet, “The Room” was filled with continuity errors, bad acting, and an incoherent plot.

Continue reading “The Disaster Artist (review)”

bookmark_borderReview: WPR rebuttal

“SenatorJPO” appeared to be going places.  He was an honors student at Wisconsin’s finest Universities, with a BA and MA to his name.  Then he graduated and appeared to be lost in the reality of underemployment.

He’s now taking on the educational establishment, as well as public radio, with his own public service radio show.  For two hours every Friday, SenatorJPO gives his “rebuttal” to the information (or misinformation) supplied by the WPR radio station run by the university. Continue reading “Review: WPR rebuttal”